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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 459 (some duplicates have been removed)
concept want to talk about is simply this -- america is not the federal government. [applause] take time to let that thought releasing in. america is not the federal government. in fact, america is not much about government at all. america's government is one of those things that you have to have but you sure don't want to much of it. it is like your family visiting over the holidays. i've got to be careful, my wife is here. this is the polar opposite of the political debate in our country today we've got one party that wants to be in charge of the federal government's of they can expand and another party that wants to be in charge of the federal government so they can get it under control. i am here to tell you that as a terrible debate. it is a debate fought entirely on our opponents terms, a debate about which party can better manage the federal government is a small and shortsighted debate. if our vision is not bigger than that, we simply don't deserve to win. our public discourse today -- america is defined by government, by the latest grooves that occur in washington, d.c. if you l
election area -- post-coup government. we have got a short-term challenge in restoring their security. the french, i think, in partnership with the military, are doing a great job. there are longer-term challenges, restoring things. this is what led to the rebellion and the coup in the first place. >> do you think they should be deploying drones? >> we have used drones against al qaeda in pakistan, afghanistan, and other places in the world. i think it is incumbent on us in the senate to make sure we have a framework for when and how we're going to approve the use of drones. i do think they are an important tool in our toolkit to fight back against islamic extremists and to take action against folks who have demonstrated to be a real threat to the united states and our regional allies. >> thank you very much for joining us from capitol hill tonight. >> thank you. >> in other news now, senior officials say that leon panetta, the defense secretary, decided to lift a ban about women in combat. it will make available hundreds of thousands of jobs. women are part of the active military per
spending cut is coming in nine days. don't listen to the big government spenders. we need budget cuts to grow the economy, shrink government and create confidence that we are not greece. and, oh, heck, my friend steve kroft lobbed a bunch of softballs at president obama and hillary clinton in his "60 minutes" interview last night. and you know what, folks, we still do not know what happened on that tragic, awful night in benghazi when four people were killed. the administration spun two separate stories, we still don't know the narrative. all that, the "kudlow report" starts right now. >>> first up tonight, it could prove to be the most significant immigration reform in years. bipartisan group of four democratic and four republican senators unveiling their blueprint this afternoon for border security, guest worker cards, more foreign brainiacs and employer verification, maybe even a path to citizenship. cnbc's own eamon javers joins us now with the details. good evening, eamon. >> well, we've almost gotten out of practice at watching bipartisan groups of senators hold press conference
, but they do it. they are. lying somehow acts of government and spending can somehow control our government to the climate we want. he said we could do something about floods and hurricanes and droughts, now the power of the ballot box extends to controlling the weather. neil: do you feel this speaks to urgency of doing something about this, what do you think? >> if you accept the united nations and al gore's view, doing, whatever they propose, would have no impact according to their figures. so it is an exercise in futility even if you believe it. the kyoto protocol. the grand-daddy of all climate treaties, which canada has just pulled out of. if that were fully ratified and enforced, it would not have a impact on global warming according to global warming activists figures, the same with u.s., cap and trade bill, obama saying it would have made our planet 4 to 5 degrees cooler. meanwhile epa was forced to say it would not affect the levels, the idea we could do something does nat bear out, only we forward to through technology, we're watching it with fracking, u.s. is down 2007 levels of
the government from defaulting on its debt. the bill passed the house on wednesday ter t republican majority changed its stance. republicans said they would not approve the bill unless the government made more cuts to social programs. republicans had public criticism that they were not consider the markets on a financial default. john boehner said to show the american people that it would move to balance the budget. >> they understand you can't continue to spend money that you don't have. we're committed to doing a budget on the house side. a budget that will balance over the next ten years. it's time for the senate and the president to show the american people how they're willing to balance a budget over the next ten years. >> the bill now goes to the senate where it's expected to pass and be approved by the white house. republicans will continue to push the government to review social security spending. the bill urges congress to compile an outline of the 2014 budget by mid-april. more business headlin next heres another checon maets. >>> u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has suggest
government actually reacted quite favorably and also responded to our demand with a change, a certain change in their policies. i must admit that i looked with a certain degree of concern at japan right now. for europe, too, it's going to be important, um, that the big injection of liquidity that was given into the markets for the sake of the banks is siphoned off again. but i think the ecb is, actually, here a very positive force. they're playing a very positive role, and they will see to it that one refrains from the policy of manipulation and that, um, one pursues a policy that actually reflects the situation as it is that everyone is doing it as is the ecb. i think we would have less problems all over the world, but that's about the extent of my comment. [speaking german] >> translator: since you've touched upon central banks, what exactly are the objectives of central banks? we have the federal reserve that has set itself an additional objective, we've seen the more recent developments in japan. what did you think about the independence? you touched upon it, alluded to it. maybe you cou
sequesters with cuts in other areas of government. we have shown how to protect defense spending by cutting spending in other areas. in our budget last year, we did take money out of defense. just not nearly as much as the president seems to want to. but we think the sequesters will happen because the democrats have opposed our efforts to replace those cuts with others and offered no alternatives. >> is this worth shutting the government down over? >> no one is talking about shutting the government down. >> well, it's a piece of the leverage that conservatives have. you didn't want to fight over the debt ceiling because you thought you can't do that, you have to pay the government's bills. do you think this fight over priority is worth shutting the government down? >> we're not interested in shutting the government down. what happens on march 1 is spending goes down automatically. march 27 is when the moment you're talking about, the continuing resolution expires. we are more than happy to keep spending at those levels going on into the future while we debate how to balance the budget, grow
to draw balance. he's a man of the progressive side. he tried to draw a balance between a government ruled by a mob. then, talked about the government we won, which is infrom a structure, education, regulation, then recognize government can't solve all of the problems. i thought that is reaching out, to the tea party right rejectionists. >> we saw in pennsylvania there is so much of the willingness to rig the election. they know they're heading into trouble and it's almost like lebanon. you know? and when i see them doing it, we're never going to be popular again so, we're going to have to rig it so gettysburg address, obama. republicans are going to have to steal elections? that is how bad nbc has gotten that. is their coverage. >> a couple points about this quote, unquote news network. on the gettysburg address, chris matthews has it exactly wrong. just the opposite. gettiesberg address was an attempt at healing the nation's wounds at the end of the civil war. obama's speech, yesterday, was a left wing declaration of war against conservative movement. so it was the opposite. as for the r
as online -- send us a tweet by typing @c spanwj. state and local governments are on their best financial shape since the recession. given leeway to cushion the u.s. economy from federal budget cuts. here are some other stories in the news. this is from "the national council of state legislatures," which runs up what lawmakers are facing as they enter their session throughout the country. it says, -- it also looks at corrections costs. helping america become more energy dependent. and paying for transportation structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is ed
again. i realize that would be gratis, you would not be on the government payroll and do the hearing i would like to have which is getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depends on the host country. this all a discussion about well, there might have been five security people on the ground, if only there was more funding or deployment, or this cable or that cable maybe there would be eight or nine security people on the ground which might have led to more protection or might have led to more casualties. in washington, the decision was made to provide well more than 16 security people to libya and nobody that i know in washington, dc, was involved in the issue of how many of those were in benghazi going with the ambassador or there in advance. the decision that all 16 weren't with him was a decision you cannot blame either political party or anyone in washington. ultimately, all we can have in our embassies is enough to keep off a militant attack for a few hours and after that if the host country doesn't come to a rescue it doe
this libyan government have the will and capacity to have the suspects involved and i think they have to strain the capacity to try to arrest powerful armed elements in the eastern part of the country and i don't know if they have it even if they have the will to use that capacity. can you tell us after the attack that they are trying to bring the culprits to justice, what do you think of the libyan government. >> you drew exactly the right description. is it well or capacity? what you need is both. i found the libyan officials to be willing, but without capacity. part of our challenge is to help them build greater capacity because it's about them. it's not only about what happened to us in benghazi which every official in the libyan government was deeply upset about, but they have their own problems now. they are having leaders attack and assassinated on a regular basis. we have to do more to build up the security capacity and i would ask this committee to work with us. there holds on a lot of the security funding that go to kwlab to assist them in building capacity. there those i kn
are the umbrella for so many other agencies in our government. if we were not there, many of those agencies representatives -- agencies' representatives would have a difficult time being there. we are the diplomatic presence that permits us to pursue law enforcement objectives, intelligence objectives, military objectives, and so much more. so it's not just about us sitting around and say, you know, do we really want our diplomats at risk? it's ok, what are the equities of the rest of the government that would be effective if we decided we had to close shop because the risk was too great? i want to stress that because i don't think you can understand, at least from my perspective, how difficult the calculation is without knowing that it's not just about the state department and usaid. secondly, i don't think we can retreat from these hard places. we have to harden our security presence but we can't retreat. we've got to be there. we've got to be picking up intelligence information, building relationships and if we had a whole table of some of our most experienced ambassadors sitting here to
of the house of january 3, 2013, of the following individuals to serve as the governing board of the office of congressional ethics. the clerk: nominated by the speaker with the concurrence of the minority leader -- mr. porter j. goss, mr. egan, ms. hayward, mr. friendswood. nominated by the minority leader with the concurrence of the speaker -- mr. david scaggs of colorado, co-chairman. mrs. yvonne burke of california. ms. karen english of arizona. mr. mike barnes of maryland,ality -- alternate. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. please take your conversations off the floor. the house -- the chair will now entertain requests for one-minutes. please take your conversations off the floor. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania rise? mr. thompson: i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. thompson: madam speaker, the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania deserves to be heard. please take your convers
knew more about libya than anybody else in our government did not see a direct threat of an attack of this nature and scale despite the overall trend of security problems that we faced. and i have to add, neither did the intelligence community. the arb makes that very clear. that the intelligence community also did not really zero in on the connection between the deteriorating threat environment in eastern libya and in benghazi. and a direct threat on our compound. so we have work to do. we have work to do inside the department. we have work to do with our partners and the d.o.d. and the intelligence community to constantly be taking in information, making sure it does get to the right people, that it isn't somehow stove piped or stalled. but that it does rise to decision makers. and i'm committed to improving every way that i can on what the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence. and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict we're going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats. not just to our government
. and it was a speech that does represent his overall view of governing. >> colby, a to f? >> strong b, not on eloquence, but in terms of laying out his agenda and what he wants to accomplish. historic in a way as well because he is the first president to use the word "gay" in an inaugural address, and it indicates where the country is now. he laid down a marker for this, talking about equality. he covered a whole lot of ground for a lot of people. >> establishing my grading system at the outset, i give a's to lincoln's second, roosevelt's first and second, and kennedy's only. i would give obama a b, maybe b +. he was far more surefooted than he has in the past. since november 6, he has shown a far clearer sense of what he wants to do, and i think this was a communitarian address, a lot more than the individuals and we have heard in recent past. >> charles? >> i will but the tide of great inflation that has inflicted the panel. if you are a liberal, this was an a +, a declaration of a liberal future, declaration that the 30 years of conservative ascendancy that began with ronald reagan, which he stayed
the liberal concept of more government taking campaign style jabs at his political opponents all the while. >> progress is not compel us to settle, century's long debates about the role of government for all time, but it does require us to act in our time. [applause] for now, decisions are upon us. we can want afford delay. we can want mistake absolutism for principle. substitute speck tack kl for politics or treat name calling for reasoned debate. [applause] we must act. we must act knowing that our work will be unperfect. we must act knowing that today's victoryings will -- victories are only partial. lou: the president sounded like he was checking off a list touching a widearray of concepts and goals. the president vowing to take up climate change after ignoring the subject for the past five years and promising to continue the purr institute of alternative energy after highly public failures. the president showed support for voting blocked that helped gain relexes, support for immigration reform and gay rights. mention of entitlements was followed by a campaign-style dig at his former o
said it's an ode to big government and you pointed out in the list, gun control, gay marriage, global warming, he not only wants to lock in every liberal agenda item, but advance it further. will he be successful? second term are notoriously not successful. >> let's add global climate warming on her, climate change. we've already passed this through the congress. it's done. is congress going to pass it? is congress going to tell the states, no, you can't put that past voter i.d. laws? only in it's bipartisan doesn't require amnesty and citizenship. gun control passed, no. i think the president was basically declaring his administration is no longer substantive achievement. it's make the democratic party and making the republicans look more extreme. taking their strength to pass positive items that pile up over in the senate never to be really considered, but give them an agenda, a view that says to the american people he's over there worried about gun control. we're worried about getting jobs. he's over there worried about trying to get gay marriage. we want prosperity for your family
of people up to that point. did you get an adequate explanation why help was not coming from our government and the president, and what's the rational decision, charlene lamb said they were watching it at the state department in real-time. >> i didn't get an adequate explanation and the question, if we have the battleships and air ships, if they're in germany. is that close enough to the middle east, should they be in italy, in north africa, should there be a military presence in libya if we have an embassy there? a lot of questions that were not fully answered a lot of questions that were incompletely answered and ultimately i think the biggest problem they tried to treat the embassy in libya like you would the embassy in paris and tried to say they're the same thing and they're not. one is in a war zone and should have been treated differently. i'm still fearful that in the future we could have another problem in libya or if syria gets a new government are we going to do the same thing and send an embassy to a new government in syria without adequate military protection, that's what i'm c
of the progressive side and tried to draw a bound between the government ruled by elite and ruled by a mob and he talked about the government that we won which is infrastructure, education, regulation and the good things and recognize the government can't solve all the problems, i thought that was a reaching out, if you will, a shout to the tea party right that's rejectionist. >> as we saw in pennsylvania, and professional that morning there's so much of this willingness to win the election by the republicans, they know they're headed into trouble. many like lebanon, take the fences down. okay, we're never going to be popular again so we're going to have to rig it. >> sean: so it's the gettysburg address, obama. republicans are going to have to steal elections. that's how bad nbc's gotten, that's the coverage. >> a couple of points about this quote, unquote news network and this quote, unquote newsman. on the gettysburg address, chris mathews has it it exactly wrong. he has the opposite. the gettysburg address was an attempt at healing of nation' wounds at the end of the civil war. obama's speech
about trying it help this government stand up security and deal with what is a very dangerous environment, from east to west, then we have to work together. i also hope we're looking forward, because right now, libya is still dangerous, it is still in a very unstable status, and whatever we can do for them, we at least ought to agree we need to do and get out there and start delivering. >> one of the members of the senate foreign relations committee, who is asking questions, is the new hampshire senator jean chacin, former governor, democratic member of the committee, who was in the hearing room. you're joining us right now from the russell building. senator shaheen? and as we wait for senator shaheen to get all hooked up there and get the audio straightened out, we've been talking about hillary clinton's testimony today in the senate. this afternoon she's going to be testifying in the house, the house foreign relations committee, which has been just as tough, if not more so than the senators have been, on the record of why susan rice was the person going out on the sunday tal
a new coalition government. >> sreenivasan: and ray suarez updates the high-powered meetings of heads of state, business leaders, and others at the world economic forum in davos, switzerland. >> brown: from mali, lindsey hilsum looks at tensions caused by government troops as they advance into islamist territory. >> sreenivasan: spencer michels has a story about trash and one city's crusade to eliminate all of it. >> reporter: san francisco boasts that it recycles 80% of all garbage, and is aiming for zero waste. but some skeptics don' believe it. >> brown: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnee.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for
.s. in the world. if there is a humanitarian crisis, it is justifiable to enter the country to stop the government from doing that. but if its is you are just unseating leaders because they're not friendly to u.s. business interests or you are replacing them with leaders who are firmly to u.s. business interests, that it does become imperialism. bowlines are really blurry and we have to watch our step. military industrial complex in this country is really powerful. i don't want it to spill over to the rest of the world and become the imperialists. host: a few tweets -- and joseph writes -- that is assessing the passed four years. i want to read from the oliver north peace that we mentioned earlier from the washington times, talking about hillary clinton and her assessment of her work. it says it has created opportunities for u.s. citizens in places that have benefited our nation. oliver north is the host of stories."ar mike is next on the republican line in indianapolis. caller: in the last four years, the only factor in the cap of hillary clinton is the miles she has trouble. a relationship to in
more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american government and jazz music. chris told us he didn't quite know how to handle that question. my suggestion involved people blowing loudly on their horns or banging loud' on their drums was not terribly helpful. we decided to ask questions to trip up the applicant. we didn't have the internet to find a quick answer but figured it out. though chris may not have come up with the answer during that exam he certainly lived the message taught by this interesting comparison. both american democracy and jazz music involved ongoing experimentation. they involve unscripted action and improvisation as we figure out the best way t
our government did not see a direct threat of an attack of this scale despite the trend of security problems we faced. i have to add, neither did the intelligence community. the a.r.b. makes that very clear that the intelligence community also did thought really zero in on the connection between the deteriorating threat environment in eastern libya and benghazi and a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do, to take in the information, making sure it gets to the right people and it isn't somehow stovepiped or stalled. that it does rise to decision-makers. i am committed to improving every way i can on what a.r.b. toll us to do on assessing our intelligence. i predict we will see all kind of threats not just to our government facilities but to private sector-facilities. in tunisia, although we protected our embassy, our school was badly damaged. we have to take a broader view. the a.r.b. gives us a start. it is not the whole story. >> thank you secretary clinton for yourto securing america's place in the world the past four years. and your contributions to world peace. the f
of mass destruction. we were told by every level of government here there were iraqi weapons of mass destruction that justified a war, the invasion of the united states. we are still searching for those weapons. they didn't exist. thousands of americans lost their lives. we could have a hearing on that if you'd like. >> ifill: while the benghazi attack was the main focus, secretary clinton also turned her attention to upheaval elsewhere in north africa. >> benghazi did not happen in a vacuum. the arab revolutions have scrambled power dynamics and shattered security forces across the region. instability in mali has created an expanding safe haven for terrorists who look to extend their influence and plot further attacks of the kind we saw just last week in algeria. >> ifill: in mali, elements of al qaeda in the islamic maghreb, known as a.q.i.m., have seized a large swath of territory, prompting france to intervene militarily with air power and ground troops. the u.s. military is providing transport flights to aid the french, and clinton said other assistance is under consideration. >
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 459 (some duplicates have been removed)